First-Year Candidates

Lau Hochi work image thumbnail

Lau Hochi

hochil@andrew.cmu.edu

Lau Hochi works in the area of human-technology relation, interactivity, cybernetics, and computational media. Through making devices, interactive systems, and installations, he explores how technology shapes our way of seeing and everyday life. His works aim to problematize the idea of power, manipulation, and adaptation in technological systems.

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Jackson McKeehan

jmckeeha@andrew.cmu.edu

Jackson McKeehan is a multidisciplinary artist exploring tragedy through camp aesthetics, queer ruralism, and pop culture. A former fashion designer and actor, he uses performance, video, and fiber to find empathy and humor in the most difficult parts of the human experience.

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Nathalie Moreno

nnmoreno@andrew.cmu.edu

As an interdisciplinary artist, Nathalie Moreno focuses on costumes, video and performance. Her work plays with the performative, often stereotypical, signifiers of Latinx identity, aiming to question and expand the iconographic significance of the Latinx body.

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David Noel

davidn@andrew.cmu.edu

David Noel combines his perspective as a transracial adoptee with his experience in the military to investigate the effects of war and how we view the other. His practice is informed by an immutable obsession with American identity, political theory, and cultural icons—using material, process, and context to construct meaning.

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Max Spitzer

maxspitz@andrew.cmu.edu

Max Spitzer is a teaching artist who works with large sculptures and small children. By conflating interactive object design, intuitive formalist abstraction, semiotic analysis, and pedagogical strategies, he questions the social implications of sculpture making and its potential to be harnessed as an educational tool.

Huidi Xiang work image thumbnail

Huidi Xiang

hxiang@andrew.cmu.edu

Working across architecture research, object design, and sculpture, Huidi Xiang explores the recursive relationship between individual idiosyncrasies and collective ideologies. Undergraduate training in architecture fosters her interests and sensibilities in the potential sociopolitical issues caused by the gap between design ideology and individual singularity.

Second-Year Candidates

Tsohil Bhatia work image thumbnail

Tsohil Bhatia

sohilb@andrew.cmu.edu

Tsohil Bhatia is an image-maker and performance artist from India working in performance art, photography, video, and new media. Memory, gender identity, domesticity, and the performance of national identity are recurrent themes in his practice, which he explores these through durational work.

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Paper Buck

pbuck@andrew.cmu.edu

Paper Buck is a trans interdisciplinary artist working across print, painting, video, photo, and installation. A foundational part of his practice is focused on anti-racist, feminist, queer praxis, and direct participation in social movements. Recent research-based projects explore the intersections of intimate and collective memory with national mythology, contemporary politics, and situated historical context.

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Jamison Edgar

jedgar@andrew.cmu.edu

Jamison Edgar uses paint, performance, and video to investigate notions of identity, sexuality, intimacy, sensationalism, lineage, and privilege. Socially collaborative and often times multidisciplinary, he views his artwork as an invitation for dialogue.

Yejin Lee work image thumbnail

Yejin Lee

yejinlee@cmu.edu

Yejlin Lee’s work fuses Eastern traditional philosophy with Western contemporary scientific consciousness, exploring Oneness between all aspects of nature. In her repetitive discipline as meditative practice, she uses digital media and performance to connect metaphysical ideas with physical phenomena.

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Michael Neumann

mneumann@andrew.cmu.edu

Adaptation and exploration are Michael Charles Neumann’s primary tools for intuitive investigation of natural phenomena, such as geology, cosmology, and evolutionary biology. His artistic research balances order and chaos through drawing, painting, interactive sculpture, found objects, analog technology, and open source tools to construct poetry in visual language.

Talya Petrillo work image thumbnail

Talya Petrillo

tpetrill@andrew.cmu.edu

Talya Petrillo is a multidisciplinary artist exploring autobiographical narrative and related observation. Her work history and academic background in psychology encourage her to reach into a consequence of emotion and place through an analysis of material and abstract form.

Third-Year Candidates

Nicholas Crockett work image thumbnail

Nicholas Crockett

ncrocket@andrew.cmu.edu

Nicholas Crockett’s work draws on experience in pop-cultural fandom and game development, and uses playful and often campy parody as a means of reconfiguring pervasive fantasies of power and excess. His work spans computer gaming, toys, role playing performance, and generative animation.

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Joy Poulard Cruz

jpoulard@andrew.cmu.edu

Joy Poulard Cruz's lived experiences as an adoptee with complex family constellations, situates her within the gray area between racial identifiers. Using art to subvert social taboos with the aim of generating cross-cultural dialogue, her work takes the form of sculpture, installation, video, photography, painting and performance.

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Shohei Katayama

skatayam@andrew.cmu.edu

Shohei Katayama uses art as a catalyst for environmental conversations. His work includes line drawings, sculpture, and conceptual installation art that examine the underlying patterns and forces of nature by showcasing unseen relationships in ecology. His work illustrates the disruption that occurs in ecological systems when one component is manipulated.

Erin Mallea work image thumbnail

Erin Mallea

emallea@andrew.cmu.edu

Erin Mallea collapses natural and national history to examine larger taxonomies and systems of producing knowledge and memory within the American landscape. Contextual, processual, and often public in nature, Erin’s work implicates herself as an individual navigating local organizations, bureaucratic systems, archives, and institutions of memory.